Blog Archives

Tribute to Dr. Schull

Jack Schull in the Special Projects Building mid 1960s [MS 170 Schull Photo Collection, McGovern Historical Center, Texas Medical Center Library]

McGovern Historical Center Staff The McGovern Historical Center has lost a dear friend and staunchest advocate this week, Dr. William “Jack” Schull. He died Tuesday morning at his home. Dr. Schull was the guiding force behind our extensive Atomic Bomb

Posted in ABCC, Dr. Schull, Japan, Manuscript Collection, Radiation Effects and Events

Mad for Mading: A Glimpse Into the Past of Public Health

Snapshot of books on shelf from Mading Collection

Keya Gokhale Special Collections Intern Are you a current public health student or researcher? Do you just love old books? Come check out the Mading collection at the McGovern Historical Center! It is a one-stop shop for information regarding the

Posted in Mading Collection, Public Health, Rare Books, Special Collections

Anniversary of the Accident at Chernobyl

Photograph of finished “Shelter” at Chernobyl, Ukraine, c. 1990. MS211 Armin Weinberg, PhD papers, TMC Library, McGovern Historical Center.

Sandra Yates Archivist and Special Collections Librarian Thirty-one years ago today on April 26, 1986, the accident at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant occurred. It is considered one of the most catastrophic nuclear accidents in history. To recognize the anniversary

Posted in ABCC, Radiation Effects and Events

Scholar-in-Residence

By Philip Montgomery Head of the McGovern Historical Center Sophia Hsu, a doctoral candidate at Rice University, is the first Scholar-in-Residence at the McGovern Historical Center. The Scholar-in-Residence program is designed to allow researchers access to the McGovern Historical Center

Posted in Medical Archives, Outreach, Rare Books, Special Collections

E-Vesalius comes to TMC Library

  By Philip Montgomery Head of the McGovern Historical Center The Electronic Vesalius project has come to the TMC Library. The e-Vesalius is a digital facsimile of Andreas Vesalius’ De Humani Corporis Fabrica, a landmark text of Renaissance anatomy that

Posted in Anatomy, Archives, Medical Archives, Rare Books, Special Collections, Vesalius

How Dr. Cooley Changed Heart Surgery

Sandra Yates Archivist & Special Collections Librarian On November 18, 2016 the Texas Medical Center lost one of its most renowned pioneers in medicine. Dr. Denton A. Cooley revolutionized cardiovascular surgery, transforming open heart surgery from one of the most

Posted in Audiovisual, Cooley, Medical Archives, Texas Heart Institute

Dr. Bertner’s Tuxedo

Sandra Yates Archivist & Special Collections Librarian File this under “Not Your Typical Day in the Archive.” We are currently standardizing how materials are stored in the archive, which means rehousing materials in standard document boxes or relocating oversize materials

Posted in Archives, Bertner, Manuscript Collection, Special Collections

Houston and the Fight Against Tuberculosis

This little bungalow at 806 Bagby St first opened in 1913 as the Free Clinic for the Houston Anti-Tuberculosis League. The organization had a clinic or offices there until 1957 when they moved to a new building on Dallas Avenue. [IC 034 San Jacinto Lung Association records, Box 5, P-921, McGovern Historical Center, Texas Medical Center Library.]

Sandra Yates Archivist and Special Collections Librarian I spent the last couple of weeks processing the records of the San Jacinto Lung Association. It’s a small collection, only 12 boxes, that includes correspondence, tuberculosis statistics, scrapbooks, Christmas seals, and photographs

Posted in Institutional Collection, Medical Archives

Rice Students Tour the Archive

Sandra Yates Archivist and Special Collections Librarian On Thursday, September 1, 2016, a class from Rice University toured the McGovern Historical Center. The students were from Sophia Hsu’s class, “Literature and Public Health,” which is part of the new medical

Posted in Archives, Medical Archives, Outreach

The TMC Flatiron that was not to be.

1966: “Bonanza” was in color[1], the shift dress was coming into vogue[2], the Beatles were singing improbably about being paperback writers[3], and international outer space law was well on its way to becoming reality[1]. The Library was considering an addition.

Posted in architecture, Institutional Collection