The MHC & Me: Thinking about Archives and Legacies

by Matt Richardson, Archivist and Special Collections Librarian.

Archivists from the McGovern Historical Center (MHC) will present a virtual brown-bag at noon on Tuesday, February 8.

Faculty, researchers, and staff across the Texas Medical Center are making history every day. Archivists can help preserve that history by ensuring that these stories are documented and accessible to future researchers. Attendees will learn about how the MHC can support their work, how (and what!) to donate to the archives, and how historical materials are made available for research.

The 30 minute talk with question and answer session will be held via Zoom. Visit the TMC Library Classes and Workshops page to register.

Posted in Archives, Medical Archives, Outreach

New Exhibit featuring Dr. Bertner on Display at the TMC Library

By Matt Richardson, Archivist and Special Collections Librarian

The McGovern Historical Center is proud to announce the opening of a new exhibit at the TMC Library. This exhibit celebrates the life and work of one of the Texas Medical Center’s founders and strongest champions, Dr. Ernst Bertner.

Presented in two sections, the exhibit uses materials from the archives to highlight both Dr. Bertner’s professional contributions and his personal life.

Dr. Bertner’s collection offers a tour through the formative years of the TMC. The “professional” half of the exhibit shows him receiving the deed to the property at the TMC Dedicatory Dinner, presiding over the Dedication of the M.D. Anderson Hospital for Cancer Research, and attending the laying of the cornerstone for Methodist Hospital, all within a span of six years. The exhibit tells this story through a mixture of photographs, event programs, and newspaper clippings.

On the “personal” side, the exhibit showcases Dr. Bertner’s service in World War I, as well as his courtship and marriage to Julia Williams Bertner. Included here are letters from Dr. Bertner’s family, as well as photographs showing the Bertners at leisure. In fact, Julia Bertner (later Naylor) deserves no small portion of credit for this exhibit—not only was she by Dr. Bertner’s side through this exciting period, but she also donated much of this material to the archives!

Putting together the exhibit also provided an opportunity to scan materials from Dr. Bertner’s archival collection. There are nearly fifty photographs and a dozen documents newly available online—think of it as “bonus material” to compliment the exhibit. That’s in addition to the two phonograph recordings of Dr. Bertner’s voice we blogged about previously.

Since the Research Center is located a few miles down the road from the main TMC Library, exhibits like this one provide an opportunity for the archives to connect to students and other visitors there. We hope you have a chance to visit and check it out!

The first case in the exhibit features archival materials highlighting Dr. Bertner's professional contributions to the Texas Medical Center.
The first case in the exhibit features archival materials highlighting Dr. Bertner’s professional contributions to the Texas Medical Center.
The second case in the exhibit features documents and photographs illustrating Dr. Bertner's personal life.
The second case in the exhibit features documents and photographs illustrating Dr. Bertner’s personal life.
E. W. Bertner, Leland Anderson, and Bishop Quinn at the TMC Dedicatory Dinner
E. W. Bertner (left), President of the Texas Medical Center, receives the deed to the TMC property from Leland Anderson (center), accompanied by Bishop Clinton S. Quinn at the Texas Medical Center Dedication Dinner, February 28, 1946. MS 002 E. W. Bertner papers MS002-033, McGovern Historical Center.
Program for the Dedication for the MD Anderson Hospital, February 17, 1944
As Acting Director of the M. D. Anderson Hospital, Dr. Bertner presided over the Afternoon Session of the Dedication of the M. D. Anderson Hospital for Cancer Research. Speakers included Governor Coke Stevenson, John H. Bickett, Jr.; Colonel W. B. Bates; Homer Rainey, Ph.D.; and Hines Baker. Scientific presentations were given by Chauncey D. Leake, Ph.D.; Frank E. Adair, M.D., and others. February 17, 1944. MS 002 E. W. Bertner papers, box 4, folder 17, McGovern Historical Center.
Dedication of Methodist Hospital
A crowd at the cornerstone laying of Methodist Hospital. Dr. Bertner is seated in the car next to the stage. A handwritten note on another photograph reads, “dedication of Methodist Hospital– Bill in car on the side. Too ill to get out.” However, the accompanying Houston Press article reports the Bertner spoke at the ceremony. 1950. MS 002 E. W. Bertner papers, MS002-044, McGovern Historical Center.
Lt. E. W. Bertner in military uniform outside a building, possibly in Europe, approximately 1917-1919
Lt. E. W. Bertner in military uniform outside a building, possibly in Europe, approximately 1917-1919. MS 002 E. W. Bertner papers, MS002-088, McGovern Historical Center.
E. W. Bertner and Julia Bertner posing outdoors, undated
E. W. Bertner and Julia Bertner posing outdoors, undated MS 002 E. W. Bertner papers MS002-118, McGovern Historical Center.
Telegram to E. W. Bertner from his family congratulating him on the establishment of the Texas Medical Center, February 23, 1946.
Telegram to E. W. Bertner from his family congratulating him on the establishment of the Texas Medical Center, February 23, 1946. MS 002 E. W. Bertner papers box 1, folder 25, McGovern Historical Center.
Posted in Archives, Bertner, Digital Collection, Exhibits, Images, Manuscript Collection

TMC History Showcase Video

Screenshot from the TMC History Showcase video by McGovern Historical Center, Texas Medical Center Library.

By Sandra Yates, Head of McGovern Historical Center

We created a short, 5-minute video to give you a taste of the great audiovisual materials that we have at the McGovern Historical Center. The video contains clips from four films and one phonograph record preserved in the archives, dating from 1947-1969. The video showcase highlights the early history of the Texas Medical Center.

List of materials featured in the showcase:

The Texas Medical Center as featured on Television by Humble Oil & Refining Co.” (1952)  [IC 002 Texas Medical Center records, AVF.IC002.003]

First 20 years of the Medical Center produced by KPRC-TV (1964) [IC 002 Texas Medical Center records, AVF.IC002.002]. Features: Dr. Michael DeBakey, Baylor College of Medicine

Passing in Review, M. D. Anderson Hospital Blood Bank (1946) [MS 002 Ernst William Bertner, MD papers, AVA.MS002.001]. Features: the voice of Dr. E. W. Bertner. Includes: Portrait of Dr. E. W. Bertner (circa 1942) [MS 070 R. Lee Clark, MD papers]

Interview With Haskell Karp 12 Hours After His Artificial Heart Implant (April 4, 1969) [IC 043 Texas Heart Institute Film Collection, AVF.IC043.270]. Features: Dr. Denton Cooley, Texas Heart Institute.

Report on the Texas Medical Center: a public service presentation recorded by the KHOU-TV (1960s) [IC 002 Texas Medical Center records, AVF.IC002.004] Features: Dr. William Spencer, TIRR.

Posted in Audiovisual, Digital Collection, Medical Archives

1950s Mental Health Services in HD

Mental Health Association of Houston and Harris County (HD). [Screenshot from "Help Wanted" (1958), AVF.MS238.001, MS 238 Films on Mental Health provided by Bill Schnapp, McGovern Historical Center, Texas Medical Center Library]

by Sandra Yates, Head of McGovern Historical Center

The holidays came early to the archives. We sent the 16mm film, “Help Wanted” (1958), to the Texas Archive of the Moving Image (TAMI) for a fresh new high-definition scan. The film returned safely from Austin with a hard drive containing a 18 GB video file. TAMI is a non-profit organization dedicated to preserving Texas’ film heritage, offering digitization services, an online library of over 5,000 searchable videos, and educational resources.

We recently posted about the film, which was created in 1958 by the Junior League of Houston to give an overview of the various mental health facilities and services in Houston. You can learn more about the collection on our collection site, Films on Mental Health provided by Bill Schnapp. The collection and film digitization were made possible through the generous support of Dr. Bill Schnapp.

You can stream the film below or via our collection site.

Before & After: Downtown Houston, circa 1958

Before & After: Neighborhood block in Houston, circa 1958

Did you spot the Jesse H. Jones Library Building just before the 11 minute mark? I almost fell out of my chair getting a closer look!

Jesse Jones Library building, Home of The TMC Library (HD). [Screenshot from "Help Wanted" (1958), AVF.MS238.001, MS 238 Films on Mental Health provided by Bill Schnapp, McGovern Historical Center, Texas Medical Center Library]
Jesse Jones Library building, Home of The TMC Library (HD). [Screenshot from “Help Wanted” (1958), AVF.MS238.001, MS 238 Films on Mental Health provided by Bill Schnapp, McGovern Historical Center, Texas Medical Center Library]
Mental Health Association of Houston and Harris County (HD). [Screenshot from "Help Wanted" (1958), AVF.MS238.001, MS 238 Films on Mental Health provided by Bill Schnapp, McGovern Historical Center, Texas Medical Center Library]
Mental Health Association of Houston and Harris County (HD). [Screenshot from “Help Wanted” (1958), AVF.MS238.001, MS 238 Films on Mental Health provided by Bill Schnapp, McGovern Historical Center, Texas Medical Center Library]
Posted in Audiovisual, Digital Collection

Texas State Board of Medical Examiners Records

By Matt Richardson, Archivist and Special Collections Librarian

In a recent post, we shared the newly published finding aids for the archival collections of three prominent Houston doctors. Well, if three doctors aren’t enough for you—how about 6,000?

Powered by a tremendous effort from Archives Assistant Gina Leonard, the McGovern Historical Center has published a detailed guide to the Texas State Board of Medical Examiners Records. This massive collection totals 98 boxes, the bulk of which contain licensure records for Texas physicians. Thanks to Gina, the list of names has made the journey from archival folders to Microsoft Excel to our searchable archival management system. Next up? A screen near you!

Each of the 6,000+ individual folders in this collection bears the name and relevant dates for a physician licensed in the state of Texas between 1907 and 1972. Included are doctors who attended medical school in Texas, as well as others coming here from other states. Within each folder, you’ll find materials related to the physician’s license, such as applications for state examinations, registration cards, correspondence, and often photos.

For an example, check out Dr. William Augustus Richardson’s application from 1933.

William August Richardson, Texas State Board of Medical Examiners Applications, 1933
William August Richardson, Texas State Board of Medical Examiners Application, 1933, IC058-b74-f64-003
William August Richardson, Texas State Board of Medical Examiners Applications, 1933
William August Richardson, Texas State Board of Medical Examiners Application, 1933, IC058-b74-f64-003v

In addition, Dr. Richardson’s file also includes a registration card, a certified mail receipt, and the letter that accompanied his $25.50 examination fee.

William August Richardson, Letter to the Texas State Board of Medical Examiners, 1933, IC058-b74-f64-004
William August Richardson, Letter to the Texas State Board of Medical Examiners, 1933, IC058-b74-f64-004

It’s worth noting that some biographical information from these files such as birthdates, places of birth, medical schools attended, and the like has been compiled in the Gazetteer of Deceased Texas Physicians. Still, there’s a whole lot more to dig through in this collection. For one thing, there is much more detailed information available in the medical examination application. On top of that, many of the files also feature supporting documents like recommendation letters, not to mention those photos. And, of course, you don’t need us to tell you that there’s nothing quite like handling the original documents.

Keeping in mind our interest in collections scattered across archives, we should point out that the Texas State Library and Archives Commission (TSLAC) also a set of records from the Texas State Board of Medical Examiners. Whereas our collection focuses on applications and other materials produced by individual physicians, TSLAC holds registers, fee books, and ledgers maintained by the Board.

Historians of medicine, genealogists, and record-keeping enthusiasts will find much to love about this extensive collection. Similarly, anyone studying the history of Texas, the evolution of professions and credentials, or migration from state-to-state would encounter both a wealth of personal stories and an abundance of data in these primary sources.

Posted in Archives, Institutional Collection, Medical Archives

Happy Archives Month!

by Matt Richardson, Archivist and Special Collections Librarian

Did you know that October is American Archives Month? On top of that, it’s also National Medical Librarians Month!

On October 13, the McGovern Historical Collections and Research Center joined the larger archives community on Twitter in celebration of #AskAnArchivist Day. We also took to the streets–ok, maybe it was the main TMC Library–to spread the good word and invite folks to #AskAnArchivist their questions in person.

To connect archives to today’s experiences, we thought current medical students (and librarians!) might be interested in getting a glimpse into how their predecessors lived and studied. That’s why, for our in-person event at the TMC Library, we brought along yearbooks from the University of Texas Medical School Records and the Baylor College of Medicine Records. We also featured a 1918 Yearbook for the Baptist Sanitarium and Hospital Training School for Nurses from the Leta Denham, RN Papers.

The McGovern Historical Center preserves materials in a variety of formats and covering a wide range of medical history beyond these twentieth century paper records. To that end, we brought along a highlight reel of digitized audiovisual materials, as well as our six-foot Andreas Vesalius reproduction.

Of course, we’re happy to take your questions anytime, and we have lots of options for connecting with us. You can contact us to ask a question or schedule a research appointment. Maybe you’re interested in contributing to the archives by donating historical materials or through financial support. And we certainly wouldn’t mind if you wanted to follow @McGovernHRC on our blog The Black Bag, as well as Twitter, Facebook, and our newly-launched Instagram account.

Posted in Archives, Medical Archives, Outreach, Texas Medical Center Library, Vesalius

Power Trio

By Matt Richardson, Archivist and Special Collections Librarian

A trio of leading medical minds have recently had guides to their archival collections published online. The McGovern Historical Center is pleased to announce the arrival of detailed finding aids for the papers of Dr. George J. Ehni, Dr. Russell J. Blattner, and Dr. Frederick C. Elliott.

MS 016 Russell J. Blattner, MD papers

Russell J. Blattner, MD made contributions to pediatrics, infectious disease research, and the development of multiple TMC institutions. He arrived in Houston in 1947 to serve as Professor of Pediatrics and Chairman of the Department of Pediatrics at Baylor College of Medicine. He played a role in the creation and success of Texas Children’s Hospital, helped establish the Blue Bird Clinic at Methodist Hospital, and helped lay the foundation for the Texas Institute for Rehabilitation and Research. Dr. Blattner’s papers focus on his research work throughout his career in St. Louis and Houston. They contains photographs, research materials, reprints, and publications. 


Photograph of Dr. Russell J. Blattner and Dr. Catherine A. Neill at the Pediatric Cardiology Symposium in Houston, 1960. Photo by Bernard Cole, Pediatric Herald. MS016-P2883, Russell J. Blattner, MD papers.

MS 052 George J. Ehni, MD papers

George John Ehni, MD was a neurosurgeon who practiced in Houston from 1949-1986. He spent two decades as chairman of the division of neurosurgery at Baylor College of Medicine. Dr. Ehni was also president of the Neurosurgical Society of America, the Southern Neurosurgical Society, and the International Society for Study of the Lumbar Spine. His papers—all 22 boxes of them—contain documents relating to Dr. Ehni’s life and career in neurology, including correspondence, manuscripts, research materials, and reprints.

Portrait of George J. Ehni, 1954. MS219-N1689, Joseph I. Maurer Photograph Collection.

MS 071 Frederick C. Elliott, DDS papers

Last but not least, the papers of Frederick C. Elliott, DDS reveal the work of one of the Texas Medical Center’s most influential leaders. Elliott championed the Texas Dental College, campaigning for it to join the University of Texas System. Later he would lead the entire Texas Medical Center, serving for more than a decade as Executive Director and Secretary of the Board of Directors. Dr. Elliott would also write and speak extensively on the University of Texas System and the Texas Medical Center. The collection includes Dr. Elliott’s manuscript on the History of the Texas Medical Center, along with recorded interviews and transcripts. It further documents his career through committee and administrative reports, correspondence, legal papers, and legislative material. Also included are scrapbooks, personal memos, manuscripts, photographs, and audio tapes. 

Frederick C. Elliott in front of the University of Texas Dental Branch Building. MS 071 Frederick C. Elliott, DDS papers.

To explore these or other collections, check out our archival descriptions at https://archives.library.tmc.edu/. Or, to learn more about the MHC and schedule an appointment for our reading room, visit https://library.tmc.edu/mcgovern/.

Posted in Archives, Manuscript Collection, Medical Archives

Archival Relationships

by Matt Richardson, Archivist and Special Collections Librarian

The McGovern Historical Center of the Texas Medical Center Library has been busy updating our collection records with information about related materials at neighboring archives. While different archives have different missions and collecting scopes, it’s not unusual for related or even overlapping collections to end up in two different places.

Reading Rooms at University of Houston Libraries Special Collections, TMC Library’s McGovern Historical Center, and University of Texas Medical Branch’s Blocker History of Medicine Collections.

For example, with our focus on the history of healthcare in Houston, the MHC naturally collected records from The Women’s Fund for Health, Education, and Research (now the Women’s Fund for Health Education and Resiliency). But the same organization is also a natural fit for the Carey Shuart Women’s Research Collection in the University of Houston Libraries’ Special Collections. A researcher interested in this organization and its work would be wise to consult both MHC’s IC 074 and UH’s 2000-002.

Similarly, both the McGovern Historical Center and the University of Texas Medical Branch’s Truman G. Blocker, Jr. History of Medicine Collections in the Moody Medical Library hold papers from Dr. William D. Seybold—MHC’s MS 004 and UTMB’s MS 37, respectively. Much of the material in UTMB’s collection relates to Dr. Seybold’s association with UTMB, as well as the Mayo Clinic. Meanwhile, the collection at the MHC spans Dr. Seybold’s career, including his work in the Texas Medical Center and Kelsey-Seybold Clinic.

Of course, it could get frustrating to think you’ve found a person or organization’s archives, only to later discover you had in fact only found some of them. Generally, archival repositories try to complement one another, and avoid scattering sets of manuscripts or records too widely. But, acknowledging that these things happen, we can at least try to help researchers navigate this landscape. To this end, we at the MHC have been updating our finding aids with links to related archival collections maintained elsewhere. It’s our hope that this will help researchers discover more resources and likewise help them plan ahead as they delve into research.

Screenshot from IC 074 finding aid in the McGovern Historical Center’s archival management system

Aside from the occasional instance where original archival papers have ended up in two different places, there are also a number of cases where the MHC has an archival collection that is complemented by an oral history collected by another institution. The Houston Public Library’s Houston Metropolitan Research Center has oral histories with Dr. Mavis P. Kelsey (whose papers make up the MHC’s MS 050), Dr. Denton A. Cooley (MHC’s MS 043), and Dr. Russell J. Blattner (MHC’s MS 016). Likewise, they have oral histories with past Texas Children’s Hospital leaders Leopold Meyer and Dr. Ralph D. Feigin (the Texas Children’s Hospital Historical Archives are the MHC’s IC 042). In addition, the Houston History Project at UH has an interview with former TMC head Richard Wainerdi (MHC’s MS 202).

And, of course, no mention of resources spread across multiple Texas archives would be complete without an acknowledgement of our statewide portal, Texas Archival Resources Online. There researchers can search these and other archives across the state and discover a rich variety of holdings—in Texas medical history, or virtually any other topic. And, closer to home, the Archivists of the Houston Area maintain a Guide to Local Repositories.

Hopefully the updates to our finding aids will help researchers better navigate the rich array of archival resources located across the Houston/Galveston region.

Do you know of other people or organizations whose archives appear at both the MHC and elsewhere? Let us know!

Image Credits

Posted in Medical Archives

Films on Mental Health Services in Houston

Members of the Junior League of Houston. [Screenshot from "Help Wanted" (1958), AVF.MS238.001, MS 238 Films on Mental Health provided by Bill Schnapp, McGovern Historical Center, Texas Medical Center Library]

by Kelly Strickland, Archives Intern

The Texas Medical Center Library, McGovern Historical Center recently processed and put on our website two historical films on the mental health services in Houston, Texas. The films which range from 1958 to 1998 were donated by Dr. William Schnapp.

The first film, called “Help Wanted,” was created 1958 by the Junior League of Houston to give an overview of the various mental health facilities and services in Houston.

Members of the Junior League of Houston. [Screenshot from "Help Wanted" (1958), AVF.MS238.001, MS 238 Films on Mental Health provided by Bill Schnapp, McGovern Historical Center, Texas Medical Center Library]
Members of the Junior League of Houston. [Screenshot from “Help Wanted” (1958), AVF.MS238.001, MS 238 Films on Mental Health provided by Bill Schnapp, McGovern Historical Center, Texas Medical Center Library]

Methodist Hospital and Jefferson Davis Hospital were both places that cared for mental health patients. The film shows images of Methodist Hospital from the 1950s! It also covers the education opportunities for psychologists, psychiatrists, and social workers at the University of Houston and Baylor College of Medicine at the time.

The Methodist Hospital. [Screenshot from "Help Wanted" (1958), AVF.MS238.001, MS 238 Films on Mental Health provided by Bill Schnapp, McGovern Historical Center, Texas Medical Center Library]
The Methodist Hospital. [Screenshot from “Help Wanted” (1958), AVF.MS238.001, MS 238 Films on Mental Health provided by Bill Schnapp, McGovern Historical Center, Texas Medical Center Library]
Mental health professionals going over patient information. [Screenshot from "Help Wanted" (1958), AVF.MS238.001, MS 238 Films on Mental Health provided by Bill Schnapp, McGovern Historical Center, Texas Medical Center Library]
Mental health professionals going over patient information. [Screenshot from “Help Wanted” (1958), AVF.MS238.001, MS 238 Films on Mental Health provided by Bill Schnapp, McGovern Historical Center, Texas Medical Center Library]
Technology used to assess mental health patients. [Screenshot from "Help Wanted" (1958), AVF.MS238.001, MS 238 Films on Mental Health provided by Bill Schnapp, McGovern Historical Center, Texas Medical Center Library]
Technology used to assess mental health patients. [Screenshot from “Help Wanted” (1958), AVF.MS238.001, MS 238 Films on Mental Health provided by Bill Schnapp, McGovern Historical Center, Texas Medical Center Library]

“Help Wanted” was narrated by Esme Patterson Gunn, former president of the Junior League of Houston, 1946-1947. We suspect her husband Ralph Gunn was the famous landscape architect behind the Museum of Fine Arts Houston Rienzi building. 

The second film, “In Their Shoes,” is a more recent look at mental health services in Houston. It was produced by Dr. Schnapp, psychiatrist Dr. Spencer Bayles, and the Mental Health Needs Council of Houston in 1998. It gives first hand accounts of mental illness as well as explanations of these illnesses by doctors from the UT Mental Sciences Institute, the Harris County Psychiatric Center, and other Houston-based organizations.

Despite the four decades in between the films, they both speak to similar themes: lack of funding for mental health services and the need to improve the services. 

The films are also interesting because they show different scenes from around Houston. The pictures here show downtown, a neighborhood, and a church.

Downtown Houston. [Screenshot from "Help Wanted" (1958), AVF.MS238.001, MS 238 Films on Mental Health provided by Bill Schnapp, McGovern Historical Center, Texas Medical Center Library]
Downtown Houston. [Screenshot from “Help Wanted” (1958), AVF.MS238.001, MS 238 Films on Mental Health provided by Bill Schnapp, McGovern Historical Center, Texas Medical Center Library]
Neighborhood block in Houston. [Screenshot from "Help Wanted" (1958), AVF.MS238.001, MS 238 Films on Mental Health provided by Bill Schnapp, McGovern Historical Center, Texas Medical Center Library]
Neighborhood block in Houston. [Screenshot from “Help Wanted” (1958), AVF.MS238.001, MS 238 Films on Mental Health provided by Bill Schnapp, McGovern Historical Center, Texas Medical Center Library]
St. Paul's United Methodist Church, Houston. [Screenshot from "In Their Shoes" (1998), AVV.MS238.001, MS 238 Films on Mental Health provided by Bill Schnapp, McGovern Historical Center, Texas Medical Center Library]
St. Paul’s United Methodist Church, Houston. [Screenshot from “In Their Shoes” (1998), AVV.MS238.001, MS 238 Films on Mental Health provided by Bill Schnapp, McGovern Historical Center, Texas Medical Center Library]

The collection also includes a transcript of “Help Wanted” and a written list of credits for both movies.

If anyone has any more information on these films or notice any other Houston-related details, please click on the Help Describe This Item link under the Notes section for either “Help Wanted” or “In Their Shoes.”

Posted in Audiovisual, Digital Collection

Graphic works sub-inventory for R. Lee Clark, MD papers

R. Lee Clark (1906-1994) was a founder of the Medical Center and specifically of UT M.D. Anderson Cancer Center. His collection, MS 070, is filled with valuable information and is one of our most heavily-used assets.

It is also one of our biggest–the record tells me it’s 420 cubic feet, or 816 boxes. If you’re wondering what that looks like, it is a literal wall of boxes.

Also, it’s still organized in our older system of Collection > Series > Box > Folder, which can lead to some confusion in inventories of very large collections because if what you want is in box 28, you have to scroll back to see if it’s Series III, Box 28 or Series VIII, Box 28 or Series X, Box 28.

To make specialized searching a little easier we’ve created a sub-inventory that lists graphic works: Photographs, articles with illustrations, artwork, and charts.

The Clark graphic works sub-inventory can be viewed here on our website.

Since we spent all that time searching the finding aid for graphic works, confirming that there were, in fact, graphic works in the folders listed, and updating format and descriptive information, we thought we deserved to have a little fun by scanning a few of them to share on the blog.

Here is Dr. Clark with interviewer N. Don Macon (MS070 Series III, Box 112, folder 6):

Macon did extensive interviews on lots of Texas Medical Center personnel. The McGovern Historical Center has both recordings and transcripts of a lot of his TMC work. Thank you for Dr. Bryant Boutwell for bringing this image to our attention.

Army Hospital Tent, 1945 (MS070 Series II, Box 9, folder 17):

Dr. Clark was in the US Army Medical Corps during World War II. This image, which I assume is staged since it’s pristine and carefully-lit, but is still interesting, is of a well-equipped Army medical tent.

Clark and someone else on the grounds of the Baker Estate, circa 1949 (MS070 Series VIII, Box 58, folder 1):

The Baker Estate was the first home of MD Anderson Cancer Hospital. Clark is here in front of the laboratory building with the house in the background.

What is now UT MD Anderson Cancer Center is Institutional Collection 014 at the McGovern Historical Center.

Captain James A. Baker (1857-1941) was an attorney and banker and an associate of William Marsh Rice. He left “The Oaks” to Rice University, which sold it to the Cancer Hospital. He was credited with solving Rice’s 1900 murder and defending his will against a forgery. His papers are held by the Woodson Research Center at Rice University.

Baker Estate, before (MS070 Series X, Box 29, folder 6):

The stables-turned-laboratory from the previous image under reconstruction, circa 1948.

Baker Estate, after (MS070 Series X, Box 29, folder 6):

. . . and that’s what the laboratory building looked like when it was completed. There are also a few shots of the interior, which was extremely plain and painted white.

MD Anderson Cancer Hospital, circa 1958 (MS070 Series VIII, Box 188, folder 3):

This is the hospital’s second home–it’s still there, buried under decades of additions. It opened in 1954 but you can tell from the cars that this is a few years later. The big dark-colored car to the left of the no-parking sign is a 1958 Buick.

Check out this sweet little 1950 Studebaker Champion.

Patients being wheeled into the new hospital, 1954 (MS070 Series VIII, Box 185, folder 5):

Patients being wheeled on gurneys into the new Cancer Hospital. Note the distinctive swirly stone on the exterior walls.

“First cobalt unit”, circa 1954 (MS070 Series VIII, Box 185, folder 7):

If you want more information on the particulars of cobalt-60-based gamma ray therapy you’ll need to ask someone else, but this was apparently the Cancer Hospital’s first cobalt unit. This is part of a large series of images that we think might have been a tour when the 1954 building first opened.

The Cancer Hospital’s inner workings, circa 1954 (MS070 Series VIII, Box 58, folder 6):

There are a lot of slides of what might be described as the bowels of the hospital, but unfortunately little to no documentation of what they are. This might be part of the laundry?

Nurse paging a patient (MS070 Series VIII, Box 188, folder 4):

It’s fun to see pictures of little everyday things. This collection suffered some water damage during Tropical Storm Allison in 2001, when the Texas Medical Center Library archives were stored in the street level, which is about half underground, of the Jesse Jones library building. The archives have been in a warehouse near the South Loop, well above ground, since 2002. This photo was apparently housed next to something blue.

Nurse wields a Geiger counter next to transport van (MS070 Series VIII, Box 188, folder 4):

I think this might be part of a series of images of a large, um, apparatus, of some sort being unloaded from a truck. I have to wonder here what the van driver thought of all this.

Unspecified event, possibly the grand opening, circa 1954 (MS070 Series VIII, Box 188, folder 4):

A Red Cross nurse serves drinks to some people with much better fashion sense than mine.

People in costumes (MS070 Series VIII, Box 189, folder 1):

There were apparently plays put on either to entertain patients as the audience, or entertain patients as the actors, or maybe both? Alas, these also have no documentation.

Centurions.

Resisting the devil. This looks like a pretty sophisticated set! The woman’s arm posture makes me wonder if this involved dance.

. . . I’m sure animal costumes seemed like a good idea at the time but this feels a bit ominous.

Cleaning the halls, circa 1950s (MS070 Series VIII, Box 188, folder 3):

This is part of a large set of photos that were rejected for use in a history of the first twenty years of MD Anderson. This one was apparently considered since it’s been edited.

“Volunteer ham radio operator who used to send messages to patients’ home town[s]”, 1950s (MS070 Series VIII, Box 185, folder 7):

Another one that didn’t quite make it into the book. It did not fare well in TS Allison but it’s still a fun bit of history.

Truman Blocker, circa 1980 (MS070 Series XIV, Box 1, folder 23), surgeon and educator for whom UTMB Galveston’s archives and rare book collections at the Moody Medical Library are named.

Franz Enzinger and Wataru Sutow, 1976 (MS070 Series XIV, Box 1, folder 23):

Franz Enzinger was a notable Austrian pathologist and Wataru Sutow was a pediatric oncologist who worked for the Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission and then later for MD Anderson Cancer Hospital. Sutow is Manuscript Collection 035 here at the McGovern Research Center. A number of ABCC physicians and researchers also worked for the Cancer Hospital because of their familiarity with the effects of radiation.

One of the funny things about working here–and probably in a lot of other institutions–is that you get really used to seeing pictures of people like Clark, Blocker, and Sutow and they start to seem like distant uncles.

Last but not least . . .

Fluffy contemplates the meaning of life, September 1974 (MS070 Series VIII, Box 409, folder7):

This kitten’s name wasn’t given but “Fluffy” seems appropriate. And she might just have been reconsidering her choice of bed linens. We do know, though, that the world has never been able to resist a cute cat. This is one of many personal and travel photos, but I’m not sure where it was taken.

Also not to be overlooked: This is in box 409. Of a single series. I told you this collection was big.

Posted in Medical Archives
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