Cross species applicability of psychiatric diagnosis and treatment (1969)

Alethea Drexler, archives assistant

I found this recently on the back of an article saved in MS159, the Dr. Herbert Fred papers (it’s crossed out because it wasn’t the item of interest).

Cross Species applicability - cat

British Medical Journal, volume 299, 23-30 December 1969, page 1569.

Scientists will note that one subject is not a valid sample size, but cat owners will note that of course cats are happier with toys, snuggles, and playmates.

It’s also good to know that the British Medical Journal values patient anonymity, even when you’re a cat.

Note: Please don’t give your cats milk.  Most adult cats are lactose intolerant and, as noted in the article, milk can cause gastric upset and diarrhea[1].

[1] PetMD, “Top Five Cat Myths Debunked“.

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Posted in Medical Archives

The goat-gland doctor of Del Rio

By Philip Montgomery

Head of McGovern Historical Center

John Richard Brinkley (1885-1942) was best known as the notorious goat-gland doctor. He made his reputation and his millions of dollars by performing xenotransplants. He inserted goat testicles into the scrotum of human males to increase their virility. He also inserted goat glands into women to cure a variety of disease including cancer.

J.R. Brinkley

J.R. Brinkley submitted this photo in 1918 to the Texas State Board of Medical Examiners to receive a license to practice medicine in Texas. The license was granted. IC 58 Texas State Board of Medical Examiner records.

Brinkley earned his medical degree from Eclectic Medical University in Arkansas in 1915.  At the time, Brinkley received his Texas license, Arkansas evidently had a reciprocal agreement with Texas. Throughout the years of controversy in the 1920s and 1930s, when Brinkley was being investigated, he never lost his license to practice medicine in Texas.

The state of Kansas did revoke his license and the federal government shut down his radio station in Kansas. He found a more receptive home in Del Rio, Texas where he established a thriving practice and the first blaster-radio station across the Rio Grande in Mexico. XER-AM broadcast at 50,000 watts and could be heard in Kansas. Brinkley introduced popular music groups, such as the Carter Family, to widespread audiences as he touted his services and the Brinkley brand of pharmaceutical remedies.

Brinkley’s success came to a slow grinding halt as the lawsuits mounted, and the FDA turned its scientific scrutiny upon his methods.

Apparently, the State of Texas never revoked his license. In 1942, the Texas State Board of Medical Examiners sent Brinkley a notice to renew his license. The notice was returned with a note that Brinkley had died that year.

brinkley+

Brinkley’s 1918 application for a license to practice medicine in Texas. IC 58 Texas State Board of Medical Examiners.

Posted in Medical Archives

Houston Archives Bazaar!

The McGovern Historical Center will be at the Houston Archives Bazaar at the White Oak Music Hall on Sunday, September 10th from 2pm – 6pm. We’ll have some collection materials, and we’re looking forward to sharing them with the community.

For more details you can go to https://houstonarchivists.org/bazaar/. Hope to see you there!

Posted in Archives, Outreach

McGovern Historical Center Reopens Sept. 5th

The McGovern Historical Center will reopen for regular business hours on Tuesday, September 5th.

MHC Hours
Tuesday-Friday 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.

Posted in Closures

McGovern Historical Center Closed

Due to the flooding in the area the McGovern Historical Center will be closed until further notice.

Philip Montgomery, Head of the McGovern Historical Center, visited the facility at 8272 El Rio this morning, August 29, 2017. He reports that there was no rain or wind damage and no noticeable power interruptions. All collection materials were unharmed and as they were on Friday afternoon.

The McGovern Historical Research Center location of the Texas Medical Center Library at 8272 El RIo, August 29, 2017. The facility is in good condition, no power outages, and all coll

The McGovern Historical Research Center location of the Texas Medical Center Library at 8272 El RIo, August 29, 2017. The facility is in good condition, no power outages, and all collection materials are unharmed.

Be safe, Houston! We’ll keep you posted when we’ll be open again.

Posted in Closures

Tribute to Dr. Schull

Jack Schull in the Special Projects Building mid 1960s [MS 170 Schull Photo Collection, McGovern Historical Center, Texas Medical Center Library]

McGovern Historical Center Staff

The McGovern Historical Center has lost a dear friend and staunchest advocate this week, Dr. William “Jack” Schull. He died Tuesday morning at his home.

Dr. William "Jack" Schull in archive of the McGovern Historical Center, Texas Medical Center Library.

Dr. William “Jack” Schull in archive of the McGovern Historical Center, Texas Medical Center Library.

Dr. Schull was the guiding force behind our extensive Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission (ABCC) collection. Using the many contacts that he cultivated during his work in Japan for ABCC and in the Texas Medical Center, he was able to preserve the personal papers of many physicians and scientists in the areas of radiation research and genetics. He promoted multicultural projects between archivists in Japan and the United States. (You can read about the ceremony that marked the culmination of a 4-year international project at the TMC News.) Most recently, he strongly endorsed the Radiation Effects & Events Archive Project, which is an expansion of the ABCC project.

Left to right, William J. Schull, Ph.D., professor emeritus of genetics and epidemiology at the School of Public Health at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston; Masahito Ando, Ph.D., a professor of archival science at Gakushuin University in Tokyo, Japan; Philip Montgomery, MLIS, CA, head of the TMC Library's McGovern Historical Center; and archivist and historian Kaori Maekawa. (Credit: Maggie Galehouse, TMC News)

At the project closing ceremony, Left to right, William J. Schull, Ph.D., professor emeritus of genetics and epidemiology at the School of Public Health at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston; Masahito Ando, Ph.D., a professor of archival science at Gakushuin University in Tokyo, Japan; Philip Montgomery, MLIS, CA, head of the TMC Library’s McGovern Historical Center; and archivist and historian Kaori Maekawa. (Credit: Maggie Galehouse, TMC News)

In addition to many of his ABCC colleagues, he has two personal collections preserved in the McGovern Historical Center:

We had an ongoing collaborative project with him to utilize facial recognition tools to identify thousands of people in his photograph collection. He was always seeking newer and better tools to collect information. In fact, he provided the archive with a couple of Mac computers to facilitate these projects. If you love pilot project documentation, you’ll find the facial recognition project report by our former Metadata Intern and Project Archivist, Kiersten Bryant, very fascinating! The project speaks volumes about Dr. Schull’s commitment to the archive.

Screenshot of Dr. Schull's Photoshop Elements catalog where he tagged as many people as he could remember. Dr. Schull appears in the center of the screen. He identified 140 people in 5400 images.

Screenshot of Dr. Schull’s Photoshop Elements catalog where he tagged as many people as he could remember. Dr. Schull appears in the center of the screen. He identified 140 people in 5400 images.

Dr. Schull will be greatly missed at the archive, but his life, legacy, and influence lives on in every collection he helped preserve.

Learn more about Dr. Schull, and we invite you to leave a thought or memory about Dr. Schull in the comments below.

Posted in ABCC, Dr. Schull, Japan, Manuscript Collection, Radiation Effects and Events

Mad for Mading: A Glimpse Into the Past of Public Health

Snapshot of books on shelf from Mading Collection

Keya Gokhale
Special Collections Intern

Are you a current public health student or researcher? Do you just love old books? Come check out the Mading collection at the McGovern Historical Center! It is a one-stop shop for information regarding the worldwide history of public health. It has works dating back as far as 1767, all the way up to the mid 20th century. Topics covered include yellow fever, cholera, public sanitation, typhoid, epidemics, typhus, sex education, and infant nutrition. It is fascinating to see how attitudes and information regarding these topics have changed over the last couple of hundred years. Notable authors include Daniel Defoe, Absalom Jones, and Benjamin Rush.

Titles available include:

Dreadful Visitation: in a Short Account of the Progress and Effects of the Plague, the Last Time it Spread in the City of London, in the Year 1665. By Daniel Defoe. | This pamphlet is the oldest work in the collection, being published in 1767. Its author, Daniel Defoe, is best known for his book Robinson Crusoe.

 

Town and Country Friend and Physician : or, An Affectionate Address on the Preservation of Health, and the Removal of Disease on its First Appearance. By James Parkinson. | Dr. Parkinson left this small handbook to his community upon his retirement. It was meant to serve as a reference guide to treating life’s ailments in his absence.

Town and country friend and physician : or, An affectionate address on the preservation of health, and the removal of disease on its first appearance. By James Parkinson-1803. [Mading Collection, McGovern Historical Collection, Texas Medical Center Library]

Town and Country Friend and Physician : or, An Affectionate Address on the Preservation of Health, and the Removal of Disease on its First Appearance. James Parkinson. 1803. [Mading Collection, McGovern Historical Collection, Texas Medical Center Library]

Account of the Bilious Remitting Yellow Fever : as it Appeared in the City of Philadelphia, in the Year 1793. By Benjamin Rush. | Benjamin Rush was a physician and one of the founding fathers of the United States.

 

Chemical and Physical Analysis of Milk, Condensed Milk, and Infants’ Milk-Foods, with Special Regard to Hygiene and Sanitary Milk Inspection : a Labor. By Nicholas Gerber. | This book provides an interesting look at different types of milk and infant feeding options in 1882. Written by the founder of the Gerber Method. 

Chemical and Physical Analysis of Milk, Condensed Milk, and infants' milk-foods, with special regard to hygiene and sanitary milk inspection : a labor. Nicholas Gerber. 1882. [Mading Collection, McGovern Historical Collection, Texas Medical Center Library]

Chemical and Physical Analysis of Milk, Condensed Milk, and Infants’ Milk-Foods, With Special Regard to Hygiene and Sanitary Milk Inspection : a Labor. Nicholas Gerber. 1882. [Mading Collection, McGovern Historical Collection, Texas Medical Center Library]

Narrative of the Proceedings of the Black People : During the Late Awful Calamity in Philadelphia, in the Year 1793: and a refutation of some censures. By Absalom Jones. | Absalom Jones was the first African American ordained priest in the United States.

 

New York (N.Y.). Mayor’s Committee on Public Baths and Public Comfort Stations. Report by the Mayor’s Committee of New York. | Believe it or not, public baths were still popular in New York City in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. This book, published in 1897, examines ways to improve the city’s baths and make them more sanitary.

New York (N.Y.). Mayor's Committee on Public Baths and Public Comfort Stations. Report by the Mayor’s Committee of New York-1897. [Mading Collection, McGovern Historical Collection, Texas Medical Center Library]

New York (N.Y.). Mayor’s Committee on Public Baths and Public Comfort Stations. Report by the Mayor’s Committee of New York. 1897. [Mading Collection, McGovern Historical Collection, Texas Medical Center Library]

Sex Instruction in Public Schools. By Willard Beatty. | This pamphlet from 1936 provides a surprisingly insightful and modern outlook on sex education in schools.

 

Treatise Upon the Causes, Prevention, and Cure of Fever and Ague, and All Forms of Miasmatic Diseases : Sanative Rules for Those Living in Malarious Districts. By W. Griswold. | In the early 1800’s, it was commonly believed that “bad air” or “miasmas” were the means by which infection spread. It was not until later that the germ theory of infection gained popularity.

 

Other items from the collection shown below. Look how unique looking some are!

Map of London from the mid 1800's. From "Snow on Cholera" by John Snow. 1936 edition. [Mading Collection, McGovern Historical Collection, Texas Medical Center Library]

Map of London from the mid 1800’s. From “Snow on Cholera” by John Snow. 1936 edition. [Mading Collection, McGovern Historical Collection, Texas Medical Center Library]

Insanity and Insane Asylums. E.T. Wilkins. 1872. [Mading Collection, McGovern Historical Collection, Texas Medical Center Library]

Insanity and Insane Asylums. E.T. Wilkins. 1872. [Mading Collection, McGovern Historical Collection, Texas Medical Center Library]

Reports from the Massachusetts state board of health. 1897-1915. [Mading Collection, McGovern Historical Collection, Texas Medical Center Library]

Reports from the Massachusetts state board of health. 1897-1915. [Mading Collection, McGovern Historical Collection, Texas Medical Center Library]

Summer and its Diseases. By J. C. Wilson-1879. [Mading Collection, McGovern Historical Collection, Texas Medical Center Library]

Summer and its Diseases. J. C. Wilson. 1879. [Mading Collection, McGovern Historical Collection, Texas Medical Center Library]

 

Posted in Mading Collection, Public Health, Rare Books, Special Collections

Anniversary of the Accident at Chernobyl

Photograph of finished “Shelter” at Chernobyl, Ukraine, c. 1990. MS211 Armin Weinberg, PhD papers, TMC Library, McGovern Historical Center.

Sandra Yates
Archivist and Special Collections Librarian

Thirty-one years ago today on April 26, 1986, the accident at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant occurred. It is considered one of the most catastrophic nuclear accidents in history.

To recognize the anniversary of this event, I’d like to share an item from the Armin Weinberg, PhD papers (MS211). “Accident at Chernobyl NPS and Its Lessons” is a booklet of twenty-four 35mm slides that outlines the events and actions taken after the Chernobyl accident. The booklet was provided to Dr. Weinberg and other international scientists studying the event and the effects of low-dose radiation in the region.

Accident at Chernobyl NPS and Its Lessons, 1990

View item at the Internet Archive

This is an exciting time at the McGovern Historical Center as we begin the Radiation Effects & Events Archive Project. Working with Dr. Weinberg at Baylor College of Medicine and Dr. William “Jack” Schull, Professor Emeritus of Human Genetics at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, we are expanding on our Atomic Bomb Causality Commission collections to encompass other areas where ionized radiation has affected the world.

For more information about the Radiation Effects & Events Archive Project, please visit the Radiation Effects & Events Archive Project page on our website.

Image of flyer that provides an overview and images fro the Radiation Effects & Events Archive Project of the Texas Medical Center Library, McGovern Historical Center.

Download the Radiation Effects & Events Archive Project Flyer (PDF).

Posted in ABCC, Radiation Effects and Events

Scholar-in-Residence

By Philip Montgomery
Head of the McGovern Historical Center

Sophia Hsu, a doctoral candidate at Rice University, is the first Scholar-in-Residence at the McGovern Historical Center.

The Scholar-in-Residence program is designed to allow researchers access to the McGovern Historical Center archives and special collections. The program encourages scholarly research and collaboration, teaching, and the use of social media.

The scholar-in-residence program allows a scholar with an interest in historical healthcare to embed themselves in the archive for one semester. During that time, the scholars can work in the stacks, which are usual off-limits to researchers, consult with archivists, acquire some hands-on archival experience, use the archive for their own classes and teaching, and explore.

Eventually, two to three scholars-in-residence will be able to work each semester at the McGovern Historical Center.

Hsu is a doctoral candidate in English at Rice University. With support from the Public Humanities Initiative Fellowship from Rice’s Humanities Research Center, she is currently finishing her dissertation, “Genres of Population: Biopolitics and the Victorian Novel,” which she will defend in March 2017. While this project examines how nineteenth-century British literature helped to shape ideas about the population and population health, her research and teaching interests expand beyond this focus to include first-year writing, gender and sexuality, literature and medicine, and postcolonial theory. Her work has appeared in English Language Notes and is forthcoming in Victorian Review.

As part of her work at the archive, Hsu will write one scholarly blog about her experience at the archive or a blog using materials in the archive related to her ongoing research.

Posted in Medical Archives, Outreach, Rare Books, Special Collections

E-Vesalius comes to TMC Library

 

By Philip Montgomery
Head of the McGovern Historical Center

The Electronic Vesalius project has come to the TMC Library. The e-Vesalius is a digital facsimile of Andreas Vesalius’ De Humani Corporis Fabrica, a landmark text of Renaissance anatomy that has been credited with inaugurating Western internal medicine.

The e-Vesalius is touch sensitive. Touching the symbols on the body brings up anatomical images and text from assorted historical anatomical texts.

ben-rasich

Rice Engineering student Ben Rasich poses next to the E-Vesalius he helped to create. The interactive “muscle man” shows historical views of anatomy.

This is a joint project, almost one year in the making, between the TMC Library’s McGovern Historical Center and various departments at Rice University, including the Humanities Research Center, Fondren Library’s Digital Scholarship Services, and the Oshman Engineering Design Kitchen.  The project included humanities scholars, rare book librarians, and engineering students.

The e-Vesalius will be on display in the library until at least May 30, 2017. Faculty, students, staff and visitors are encouraged to explore the interactive e-Vesalius.

This life-size model is reproduced from a 1934 reprint of the book, made with the original 1543 woodcuts, except for the label “s” on the neck, which comes from the 1543 edition. The 1934 reprint has crisper images, which created a higher-quality scan suitable for this project. This is a one-of-a-kind project depicting one of the 14 anatomical views of the human body. Plans are being considered to develop a larger project with all 14 of Vesalius’ “muscle men.”

Collaborative projects are an important part of the work of the McGovern Historical Center. Using rare books in innovative ways inspires and challenges our understanding of the history of medicine.

Everyone at the McGovern Historical Center sincerely thanks the Rice team including faculty and staff John Mulligan, Matthew Wettergreen, and Ying Jin, as well Rice engineering students Benjamin Rasich and Isaac Philips. Their work was funded by a grant from the Rice Humanities Research Center’s public humanities initiative, with support from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

Posted in Anatomy, Archives, Medical Archives, Rare Books, Special Collections, Vesalius
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