Dr. E. Trowbridge Wolf’s Notes

by Sandra Yates, Archivist and Special Collections Librarian

Have you ever wondered what four years of medical school looks like? Or maybe even wondered about the courses, material, and techniques taught in medical schools in the 1930s?

Well, you’re in luck! I came across six volumes of notes taken by Edward Trowbridge Wolf during his studies at Jefferson Medical College in Philadelphia (1929-1933). They cover all four years of his medical school courses and subjects from Anatomy to Urology.

Six bound volumes of medical school notes (1929-1933).

Six bound volumes of medical school notes (1929-1933). Edward Trowbridge Wolf, MD Papers, MS003, Box 5

Here’s a page from Volume V: Obstetrics and Gynecology. It details Cancer of Uterus, its symptoms and features, which was covered in Dr. Anspach’s Gynecology class on February 9, 1932.

Page of notes about Cancer of Uterus, Feb. 9, 1932.

Page of notes about Cancer of Uterus, Feb. 9, 1932. Edward Trowbridge Wolf, MD Papers, MS003, Box 5

Hope you read the above page thoroughly because it’s time for Dr. Schaeffer’s Gynecology Quiz! The answers are included, so I know you’ll do great!

Gynecology Quiz from Dr. Wolf's medical school notes dated February 16, 1932.

Page 1: Gynecology Quiz from Dr. Wolf’s medical school notes dated February 16, 1932. Edward Trowbridge Wolf, MD Papers, MS003, Box 5

Gynecology Quiz from Dr. Wolf's medical school notes dated February 16, 1932.

Page 2: Gynecology Quiz from Dr. Wolf’s medical school notes dated February 16, 1932. Edward Trowbridge Wolf, MD Papers, MS003, Box 5

Edward Trowbridge Wolf was born in Pittsburgh in 1900. He earned his medical degree in 1933 from Jefferson Medical College in Philadelphia. Not long after, he moved to Houston and established an Internal Medicine practice at 4411 Fannin that lasted 46 years. During World War II, Dr. Wolf was a lieutenant colonel in the U.S. Army Medical Corp, serving in Australia and New Guinea. Before and after the war, Dr. Wolf was an active member in the Houston medical community as well as the growing Texas Medical Center. He held a faculty position at Baylor College of Medicine from 1943 to 1975. He served on the publication committees for both Methodist Hospital and Harris County Medical Society. He was editor of the Harris County Medical Society’s Medical Record and Annals for ten years. His papers are housed at The TMC Library’s McGovern Historical Center.

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Posted in Archives, Manuscript Collection
7 comments on “Dr. E. Trowbridge Wolf’s Notes
  1. Dr. Wolf was my grandfather. I miss him.

    • mcgovernhrc says:

      Hello Michael,

      Thanks for your reply. When you are in Houston, please visit the archives. We would love to show you your Grandfather’s papers.

      Regards,
      Philip Montgomery
      Head of McGovern Historical Center

    • Linné Girouard says:

      I remember him well – he came into the library often when I was working there! He was such a sweetheart, we all loved him! He’d say – we “practically invented obstetrics at the county hospital”.

  2. Dr. Wolf was my family’s doctor. He made home visits when I was a child. My mother is 91, has dementia, but asks about him. I’ve been searching internet for photos of him. Would love to connect. Thank you for posting this.

    • mcgovernhrc says:

      Please feel free to contact the McGovern Historical Center. We have photos of Dr. Wolf. Here is our contact information: http://library.tmc.edu/mcgovern/about/contact/

      • Thank you. This will help considerably with bringing back my Mother’s memory of the past. He was a fabulous doctor. I remember going to his home, which was also his office, I remember his wife who was so kind to us, and I especially remember as a child being fascinated with the elevator in their home. There’s a longer story behind how we became his patients. Perhaps I can share at another time. Thank you so much for the link to McGovern Historical Center. Emily Salazar

  3. My name is Michael Sheinfeld. I am Dr. Wolfs grandson. My grandparents helped raise me and I spent a large part of my life at 4411 Fannin Street I miss him more than you know. He was really my father. We used to build electronic kits together and we shared so many wonderful times together.

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