Winter morning glory

Folder 123.12 MS067

By Philip Montgomery

Head of the McGovern Historical Collections

Morning Glory

Morning Glory, woodblock print, Meiji Period (1868-1912), MS 67 , William Schull PhD papers, box 123, folder 12.

The Christmas season is here along with damp, grey skies. My to-do list is longer than usual, and my cure for holiday despair is eating sweets or spending money. First of all I am grateful I can do both, but neither one is a cure for what ails me. Since other people may also have the pre-Christmas blahs, I thought a little bit of sunny, glorious spring might chase the blues away and get me back into the holiday spirits. So here is a little present from the McGovern Historical Center to you.

This Meiji Period (1868-1912) color woodblock print is of a Japanese morning glory. The print is located in MS 67, The William J. Schull, PhD Papers, box 123, folder 12.

My good friend Izumi HIRANO did some research on this woodblock print.  Izumi is a doctoral candidate in archival science at Gakushuin University in Tokyo. She called upon some of her friends to answer questions about the print.

Izumi said, “First of all, the letters on the left-side show the variety of the flower.There is a rule for the elements that consist of the name, from the top, ①leaf color ②pattern on leaf ③quality and form of leaf ④color of flower and pattern on petal ⑤the way the flower blooms ⑥information on petal layers

“Thus,①青水晶 Ao-sui(or zui) shoo・・・leaf color
②斑入 Fuiri・・・・・・・・pattern on leaf
③菊水爪巻葉 Kikusui-tsumemaki-yoo・・quality and form of leaf
④照紺 Shookon(or Terikon)・・・color of flower
④髭交 Hige-majiri・・・・・・・・・・・pattern on petal
⑤鳥甲入 Torikoo-iri・・・・・・・・・・the way the flower blooms
⑥獅子牡丹 Shishi-botan・・・・・・・・・・information on petal layers

“When you read the long name from the top, that is the name of the variety. Everybody involved know the rule and how you call a particular feature of a flower, so one could guess what a particular morning glory look like by reading its name.”

Evidently, Japanese horticulturalists fell in love with the lowly morning glory just as the Dutch fell in love with the tulip. The Japanese gardeners raised the morning glory to an art form.

There is a little more to the story of this print including its relationship to the science of genetics and the hunt for this particular print. So enjoy. Have a happy holiday, and while you dream of sugar plum fairies, take a stroll through an imaginary garden filled with morning glories.

Posted in Uncategorized

Helen Holt, Houston Academy of Medicine Librarian

Sandra Yates
Archivist and Special Collections Librarian

In the course of my research for the Library Centennial, I met the first full-time librarian of the Houston Academy of Medicine today, and I have to say that it has been one of the more exciting days in the archive. Helen Holt began working at the Houston Academy of Medicine Library in 1927, soon after the library and Harris County Medical Society moved into the brand new Medical Arts Building. I can imagine her first few months were spent unpacking and getting the library into shape.

Framed photograph of Helen Holt Garrott with plaque that reads, "Mrs. Helen Holt Garrott, in Recognition of 30 Years of Devoted Services As Librarian, Houston Academy of Medicine, 1927 - 1957" [P-3355, Oversize, McGovern Historical Center]

Framed photograph of Helen Holt Garrott with plaque that reads, “Mrs. Helen Holt Garrott, in Recognition of 30 Years of Devoted Services As Librarian, Houston Academy of Medicine, 1927 – 1957″ [P-3355, Oversize, McGovern Historical Center]

By August 1927, Miss Holt was entering new book and journal titles into the accession log. The image below shows her first entries.

Page from the Houston Academy of Medicine library accession log. First entry by the new librarian, Helen Holt, on August 1927. [IC001, Accessions, HAM-TMC Library Collection, McGovern Historical Center]

Page from the Houston Academy of Medicine library accession log. First entry by the new librarian, Helen Holt, on August 1927. [IC001, Accessions, HAM-TMC Library Collection, McGovern Historical Center]

The Medical Arts Building broke ground in 1926, and it was part of the construction boom in Houston during the 1920s. Image below is the groundbreaking ceremony with leaders of the Harris County Medical Society.

Groundbreaking for the Medical Arts Building at Caroline and Walker in downtown Houston, TX. Caption reads: "Mrs. T. A. Dickson (center), President of the Ladies’ Auxiliary of the Harris County Medical Society, turned the first spade of earth for the site of the new $1,750,000 Medical Arts Building, Caroline Street and Walker Avenue, From left to right are: DR. John T. Moore, Vice President; Dr. E. H. Lancaster, Director; Dr. Ralph Cooley, Director; Dr. John Foster, Director; Dr. W. G. Priester, Vice President; Don Hall, Contractor; Dr. Munford W. Hoover, Director, and Dr. A. H. Flickwir, Secretary-Treasurer." [McGovern Historical Center, Framed Oversize]

Groundbreaking for the Medical Arts Building at Caroline and Walker in downtown Houston, TX. Caption reads: “Mrs. T. A. Dickson (center), President of the Ladies’ Auxiliary of the Harris County Medical Society, turned the first spade of earth for the site of the new $1,750,000 Medical Arts Building, Caroline Street and Walker Avenue, From left to right are: DR. John T. Moore, Vice President; Dr. E. H. Lancaster, Director; Dr. Ralph Cooley, Director; Dr. John Foster, Director; Dr. W. G. Priester, Vice President; Don Hall, Contractor; Dr. Munford W. Hoover, Director, and Dr. A. H. Flickwir, Secretary-Treasurer.” [McGovern Historical Center, Framed Oversize]

Here is the finished Medical Arts Building at Caroline Street and Walker Avenue. The Houston Academy of Medicine Library and Harris County Medical Society Meeting Room occupied half of the 16th Floor. The building was demolished around 1986.

Postcard of Medical Arts Building around the time it opened in 1926. The Houston Academy of Medicine Library and Harris County Medical Society Meeting Room took half of the 16th floor (top floor). The building was occupied by Harris County Medical Society and Houston Dental Society members. [IC091, hou43, Texas Health Facilities Postcard Collection, McGovern Historical Center]

Postcard of Medical Arts Building around the time it opened in 1926. The Houston Academy of Medicine Library and Harris County Medical Society Meeting Room took half of the 16th floor (top floor). The building was occupied by Harris County Medical Society and Houston Dental Society members. [IC091, hou43, Texas Health Facilities Postcard Collection, McGovern Historical Center]

Posted in Centennial, Harris County Medical Society, Hospitals

Hermann Hospital Radiology Department

by Sandra Yates, Archivist and Special Collections Librarian

The TMC Library will be celebrating its centennial next year, and I’ve been searching high and low for images to adorn the website. These may or may not help the website, but I found a couple of great 1953 images from Hermann Hospital. Radiology was one of many areas of instruction at this teaching hospital. These images were for the 1952 Annual Report, which is available to read below.

Radiology Department X-ray Technicians are trained by Dr. Luther M. Vaughn, 1953. From left to right: Dr. Luther M. Vaughn, Nancy Rogers, Suzi MacAllister, and Margaret Echols, playing the patient is Walter Sterling. [McGovern Historical Center, Gift of Dr. Luther M. Vaughn, Photo Files, Institutions and Organizations, Hermann Hospital Radiology Department, 1953]

Radiology Department X-ray Technicians are trained by Dr. Luther M. Vaughn, 1953. From left to right: Dr. Luther M. Vaughn, Nancy Rogers, Suzi MacAllister, and Margaret Echols, playing the patient is Walter Sterling. [McGovern Historical Center, Gift of Dr. Luther M. Vaughn, Photo Files, Institutions and Organizations, Hermann Hospital Radiology Department, 1953]

Examining X-ray photographs at Hermann Hospital, 1953. Seated at left is a resident from Iraq, Dr. Mohamed Aba Tabik (Dr. Mo), standing is Dr. Luther Vaughn, seated facing the light stand is Dr. William Owsley. [McGovern Historical Center, Gift of Dr. Luther M. Vaughn, Photo Files, Medical Equipment and Apparatus, Hermann Hospital X-ray equipment, 1953]

Examining X-ray photographs at Hermann Hospital, 1953. Seated at left is a resident from Iraq, Dr. Mohamed Aba Tabik (Dr. Mo), standing is Dr. Luther Vaughn, seated facing the light stand is Dr. William Owsley. [McGovern Historical Center, Gift of Dr. Luther M. Vaughn, Photo Files, Medical Equipment and Apparatus, Hermann Hospital X-ray equipment, 1953]

Hermann Hospital Annual Report for 1952. The report highlights that it has been a teaching hospital since 1925. [McGovern Historical Center, Reference File, Hermann Hospital]

Hermann Hospital Annual Report for 1952. The report highlights that it has been a teaching hospital since 1925. [McGovern Historical Center, Reference File, Hermann Hospital]

Hermann Hospital was established in 1925 as specified in George H. Hermann’s will. Built on the out-skirts of Houston on a little dirt road called Fannin, it began as a private community hospital to serve the indigent population of the city as well as educate local healthcare providers. As The Hermann Horizons magazine states 50 years later:

When it opened its doors in 1925 at the edge of town on then-unpaved Fannin Street, Hermann became the cornerstone of what later was to grow into the world famous medical complex, The Texas Medical Center.

In the early years, patients rode street cars to the end of the Fannin line, then followed an oyster-shell walk to the hospital entrance. A sparkling fountain in the open courtyard greeted patients entering through the ornate wrought-iron doors. In the lobby, gently whirring ceiling fans stirred the air. – The Hermann Horizons, vol.3 no.1, Sept 1976

Posted in Archives, Centennial, Hospitals, Medical Archives

Medical World News: Contact Sheets and Photo Shoots

by Sandra Yates
Archivist and Special Collections Librarian

I’ve been working with a media firm to find archival materials for a documentary about the history of cancer. They are specifically looking for images within our Medical World News Collection. This project has been a great opportunity for me to familiarize myself with this amazing photograph collection and all it has to offer. It consists of photographic prints and negatives. When I say negatives, I can also say outtakes. For a typical article a photographer might shoot about 6 rolls of film with 36 frames. From those 216 shots, only 2-3 images might be used in the published article. Does this mean the other 213 images are rubbish? Not at all! An editor has to make some tough decisions with limited space on the page, and many great images are omitted by no fault of their own.

Below is a contact sheet of the 1966 Lasker Awards banquet. Contact sheets (also known as proofs) are a great research tool because they allow you to view an entire roll of film on one sheet. Within the publishing and photographic process, they are essential for assessing the quality (sharpness, exposure, lighting, and composition) of each image in order to decide which frames should or shouldn’t be enlarged. Imagine that you’re a magazine editor, which images would you publish?

Contact Sheet from 1966 Lasker Awards. Individuals in the image include: Dr. Sidney Farber, Dr. Michael E. DeBakey, Mary Lasker, Dr. George E. Palade. Photographer, Mottke Weissman. [Medical World News Collection, McGovern Historical Center, IC077, Folder 21.9, negative# MW-250A-04]

Contact Sheet from 1966 Lasker Awards. Individuals in the image include: Dr. Sidney Farber, Dr. Michael E. DeBakey, Mary Lasker, Dr. George E. Palade. Photographer, Mottke Weissman.
[Medical World News Collection, McGovern Historical Center, IC077, Folder 21.9, negative# MW-250A-04]

In contrast, here is a roll of negative film on a lightbox of Dr. Sidney Farber working in his Boston Office in 1966. The small 35mm frames are more difficult to assess their quality. Can you pick one frame that should be a 8″ x 10″ print? If you can, hold on! We have 15 more rolls of film from this photo shoot that you need to go through before you can make your final decision.

Roll of 35mm film negative being viewed on a lightbox from the Dr. Sidney Farber feature in the November 25, 1966 issue of Medical World News. The photo shoot took place at Dr. Faber's offices in Boston on October 18, 1966, photographer Joe Baker. [Medical World News Collection, McGovern Historical Center, IC077, negative# MW-118A-11]

Roll of 35mm film negative being viewed on a lightbox from the Dr. Sidney Farber feature in the November 25, 1966 issue of Medical World News. The photo shoot took place at Dr. Farber’s offices in Boston on October 18, 1966, photographer Joe Baker.
[Medical World News Collection, McGovern Historical Center, IC077, negative# MW-118A-11]

The Lasker Awards is one of the most prestigious science awards programs in the world and has been held in New York since 1945. It was established by Albert and Mary Lasker to recognize major innovations and advancements in medicine, especially in the area of cancer research. The recipients of the 1966 Lasker Awards were:

  • Dr. Sidney Farber, who received the Albert Lasker Award for Clinical Research for his career-long work to control childhood leukemia.
  • George E. Palade, who received the Lasker Award for Basic Medical Research for redefining the structure and functions of cells.
  • Eunice Kennedy Shriver, who received the Lasker Award for Public Service in Health for championing legislation to improve care for the mentally retarded.
Posted in Archives, Institutional Collection, Medical World News

Cortisone

by Sandra Yates
Archivist and Special Collections Librarian

As you may or may not know, the McGovern Historical Center houses the personal and professional papers of Philip S. Hench, MD. He was awarded the Nobel Prize in 1950 as co-developer of cortisone treatment for rheumatoid arthritis. While looking through some boxes in the archive, we found this rather dramatic photograph of Hench (second from right) and his colleagues at the Mayo Clinic demonstrating the wonders of a cortisone injection on a Life magazine photographer.

"When Life magazine sent the celebrated ALFRED EISENSTAEDT out to Mayo Clinic to photograph work on cortisone, Mayo consultants retaliated by throwing him on an examining table and subjecting him to cruel duress. At reader's left: Dr. CHARLES H. SLOCUMB; at his left: Dr. EDWARD C. KENDALL (1886-1972), who discovered and partially synthesized cortisone; center: Dr. JAMES ECKMAN; at his left: Dr. PHILIP S. HENCH (1896-1965), who introduced cortisone into the clinical practice of medicine; at his left: Dr. HOWARD F. POLLEY (applying protractor to determine mobility of joint). Dr. KENDALL and Dr. HENCH received the Nobel Prize in Physiology and Medicine in 1950 for their work on cortisone. Photograph taken at Saint Mary's Hospital, Rochester, Minnesota, on May 11, 1949, by ERVIN W. MILLER, Section of Photography of the Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota." [Philip S. Hench, MD Papers, MS076, McGovern Historical Center]

“When Life magazine sent the celebrated ALFRED EISENSTAEDT out to Mayo Clinic to photograph work on cortisone, Mayo consultants retaliated by throwing him on an examining table and subjecting him to cruel duress. At reader’s left: Dr. CHARLES H. SLOCUMB; at his left: Dr. EDWARD C. KENDALL (1886-1972), who discovered and partially synthesized cortisone; center: Dr. JAMES ECKMAN; at his left: Dr. PHILIP S. HENCH (1896-1965), who introduced cortisone into the clinical practice of medicine; at his left: Dr. HOWARD F. POLLEY (applying protractor to determine mobility of joint). Dr. KENDALL and Dr. HENCH received the Nobel Prize in Physiology and Medicine in 1950 for their work on cortisone. Photograph taken at Saint Mary’s Hospital, Rochester, Minnesota, on May 11, 1949, by ERVIN W. MILLER, Section of Photography of the Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota.”
[Philip S. Hench, MD Papers, MS076, McGovern Historical Center]

You can review the finding aid on the McGovern Historical Center website for more information about Philip S. Hench, MD Papers.

Posted in Archives, Manuscript Collection

Product News: Shopping Hints from 1967

by Sandra Yates, Archivist and Special Collections Librarian

Archives Assistant, Gina, started a much-needed inventory of the Medical World News Collection this week. To our surprise, it isn’t just medical news! The archive staff had a great time looking at some of the cutting-edge household products of 1967, and we think you will, too. Here’s a handful of our favorites. You might have some of these concepts in your home today.

The poodle looks annoyed. - Shopping Hints #94, Item #2, Pet Bed. Product News, 2/3/1967. [Medical World News Collection, McGovern Historical Center, IC077, Folder 94.40]

The poodle looks annoyed. – Shopping Hints #94, Item #2, Pet Bed. Product News, 2/3/1967. [Medical World News Collection, McGovern Historical Center, IC077, Folder 94.40]

The Clapper! - Shopping Hints #95, Item #2, Sound Switch. Product News, 2/10/1967. [Medical World News Collection, McGovern Historical Center, IC077, Folder 94.40]

The Clapper! – Shopping Hints #95, Item #2, Sound Switch. Product News, 2/10/1967. [Medical World News Collection, McGovern Historical Center, IC077, Folder 94.40]

It's a pool table and a table! - Shopping Hints #99, Item #2, Billiard Buffet. Product News, 3/17/1967. [Medical World News Collection, McGovern Historical Center, IC077, Folder 94.39]

It’s a pool table and a table! – Shopping Hints #99, Item #2, Billiard Buffet. Product News, 3/17/1967. [Medical World News Collection, McGovern Historical Center, IC077, Folder 94.39]

A place to put your cig while you brush your teeth! - Shopping Hints #99, Item #4, Mountable Ashtray. Product News, 3/17/1967. [Medical World News Collection, McGovern Historical Center, IC077, Folder 94.39]

A place to put your cig while you brush your teeth! – Shopping Hints #99, Item #4, Mountable Ashtray. Product News, 3/17/1967. [Medical World News Collection, McGovern Historical Center, IC077, Folder 94.39]

Useful and tidy! - Shopping Hints #105, Item #4, Stackable Tables. Product News, 4/21/1967. [Medical World News Collection, McGovern Historical Center, IC077, Folder 94.38]

Useful and tidy! – Shopping Hints #105, Item #4, Stackable Tables. Product News, 4/21/1967. [Medical World News Collection, McGovern Historical Center, IC077, Folder 94.38]

Look at all that food! - Shopping Hints #103, Item #2, Convertible Refrigerator. Product News, 4/7/1967. [Medical World News Collection, McGovern Historical Center, IC077, Folder 94.38]

Look at all that food! – Shopping Hints #103, Item #2, Convertible Refrigerator. Product News, 4/7/1967. [Medical World News Collection, McGovern Historical Center, IC077, Folder 94.38]

It's about the stool, not the suspicious looks over a grapefruit. - Shopping Hints #105, Item #2, Adjustable Stool. Product News, 4/21/1967. [Medical World News Collection, McGovern Historical Center, IC077, Folder 94.38]

It’s about the stool, not the suspicious looks over a grapefruit. – Shopping Hints #105, Item #2, Adjustable Stool. Product News, 4/21/1967. [Medical World News Collection, McGovern Historical Center, IC077, Folder 94.38]

Sigh... folding towels to music. - Shopping Hints #96, Item #4, Stereo Theatre. Product News, 3/3/1967. [Medical World News Collection, McGovern Historical Center, IC077, Folder 94.39]

Sigh… folding towels to music. – Shopping Hints #96, Item #4, Stereo Theatre. Product News, 3/3/1967. [Medical World News Collection, McGovern Historical Center, IC077, Folder 94.39]

Posted in Institutional Collection, Medical World News

Mystery church: Solved!

Alethea Drexler

archives assistant

We got a pile of emails about this one, from architectural detectives from who knows how many institutions and organizations.

After a lot of wrangling, Lauren at the University of Houston suggested that it might be the First Evangelical Lutheran Church, which is no longer standing but was located on Texas Avenue between Austin and Caroline Streets–she noted, too, that maps showed a curve in the streetcar tracks on Caroline.  Several readers have commented on the streetcar tracks, which do curve.

The First Evangelical Lutheran was founded in 1851 and their website says that the congregation “moved to the northwest corner of Texas Avenue at Caroline Street, to a new red brick and sandstone edifice built in the Gothic tradition” in 1901.  I emailed them.  They emailed me back but also passed my inquiry to Preservation Houston.

Jim with Preservation Houston called me to say they had gotten a “flood of emails” all of a sudden about an unidentified church in a blog post but confirmed that it was the First Evangelical Lutheran and said that there is a memorial plaque on a lamppost near its former location.

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Posted in architecture, Images
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