Hermann Hospital Radiology Department

by Sandra Yates, Archivist and Special Collections Librarian

The TMC Library will be celebrating its centennial next year, and I’ve been searching high and low for images to adorn the website. These may or may not help the website, but I found a couple of great 1953 images from Hermann Hospital. Radiology was one of many areas of instruction at this teaching hospital. These images were for the 1952 Annual Report, which is available to read below.

Radiology Department X-ray Technicians are trained by Dr. Luther M. Vaughn, 1953. From left to right: Dr. Luther M. Vaughn, Nancy Rogers, Suzi MacAllister, and Margaret Echols, playing the patient is Walter Sterling. [McGovern Historical Center, Gift of Dr. Luther M. Vaughn, Photo Files, Institutions and Organizations, Hermann Hospital Radiology Department, 1953]

Radiology Department X-ray Technicians are trained by Dr. Luther M. Vaughn, 1953. From left to right: Dr. Luther M. Vaughn, Nancy Rogers, Suzi MacAllister, and Margaret Echols, playing the patient is Walter Sterling. [McGovern Historical Center, Gift of Dr. Luther M. Vaughn, Photo Files, Institutions and Organizations, Hermann Hospital Radiology Department, 1953]

Examining X-ray photographs at Hermann Hospital, 1953. Seated at left is a resident from Iraq, Dr. Mohamed Aba Tabik (Dr. Mo), standing is Dr. Luther Vaughn, seated facing the light stand is Dr. William Owsley. [McGovern Historical Center, Gift of Dr. Luther M. Vaughn, Photo Files, Medical Equipment and Apparatus, Hermann Hospital X-ray equipment, 1953]

Examining X-ray photographs at Hermann Hospital, 1953. Seated at left is a resident from Iraq, Dr. Mohamed Aba Tabik (Dr. Mo), standing is Dr. Luther Vaughn, seated facing the light stand is Dr. William Owsley. [McGovern Historical Center, Gift of Dr. Luther M. Vaughn, Photo Files, Medical Equipment and Apparatus, Hermann Hospital X-ray equipment, 1953]

Hermann Hospital Annual Report for 1952. The report highlights that it has been a teaching hospital since 1925. [McGovern Historical Center, Reference File, Hermann Hospital]

Hermann Hospital Annual Report for 1952. The report highlights that it has been a teaching hospital since 1925. [McGovern Historical Center, Reference File, Hermann Hospital]

Hermann Hospital was established in 1925 as specified in George H. Hermann’s will. Built on the out-skirts of Houston on a little dirt road called Fannin, it began as a private community hospital to serve the indigent population of the city as well as educate local healthcare providers. As The Hermann Horizons magazine states 50 years later:

When it opened its doors in 1925 at the edge of town on then-unpaved Fannin Street, Hermann became the cornerstone of what later was to grow into the world famous medical complex, The Texas Medical Center.

In the early years, patients rode street cars to the end of the Fannin line, then followed an oyster-shell walk to the hospital entrance. A sparkling fountain in the open courtyard greeted patients entering through the ornate wrought-iron doors. In the lobby, gently whirring ceiling fans stirred the air. – The Hermann Horizons, vol.3 no.1, Sept 1976

Posted in Archives, Centennial, Hospitals, Medical Archives

Medical World News: Contact Sheets and Photo Shoots

by Sandra Yates
Archivist and Special Collections Librarian

I’ve been working with a media firm to find archival materials for a documentary about the history of cancer. They are specifically looking for images within our Medical World News Collection. This project has been a great opportunity for me to familiarize myself with this amazing photograph collection and all it has to offer. It consists of photographic prints and negatives. When I say negatives, I can also say outtakes. For a typical article a photographer might shoot about 6 rolls of film with 36 frames. From those 216 shots, only 2-3 images might be used in the published article. Does this mean the other 213 images are rubbish? Not at all! An editor has to make some tough decisions with limited space on the page, and many great images are omitted by no fault of their own.

Below is a contact sheet of the 1966 Lasker Awards banquet. Contact sheets (also known as proofs) are a great research tool because they allow you to view an entire roll of film on one sheet. Within the publishing and photographic process, they are essential for assessing the quality (sharpness, exposure, lighting, and composition) of each image in order to decide which frames should or shouldn’t be enlarged. Imagine that you’re a magazine editor, which images would you publish?

Contact Sheet from 1966 Lasker Awards. Individuals in the image include: Dr. Sidney Farber, Dr. Michael E. DeBakey, Mary Lasker, Dr. George E. Palade. Photographer, Mottke Weissman. [Medical World News Collection, McGovern Historical Center, IC077, Folder 21.9, negative# MW-250A-04]

Contact Sheet from 1966 Lasker Awards. Individuals in the image include: Dr. Sidney Farber, Dr. Michael E. DeBakey, Mary Lasker, Dr. George E. Palade. Photographer, Mottke Weissman.
[Medical World News Collection, McGovern Historical Center, IC077, Folder 21.9, negative# MW-250A-04]

In contrast, here is a roll of negative film on a lightbox of Dr. Sidney Farber working in his Boston Office in 1966. The small 35mm frames are more difficult to assess their quality. Can you pick one frame that should be a 8″ x 10″ print? If you can, hold on! We have 15 more rolls of film from this photo shoot that you need to go through before you can make your final decision.

Roll of 35mm film negative being viewed on a lightbox from the Dr. Sidney Farber feature in the November 25, 1966 issue of Medical World News. The photo shoot took place at Dr. Faber's offices in Boston on October 18, 1966, photographer Joe Baker. [Medical World News Collection, McGovern Historical Center, IC077, negative# MW-118A-11]

Roll of 35mm film negative being viewed on a lightbox from the Dr. Sidney Farber feature in the November 25, 1966 issue of Medical World News. The photo shoot took place at Dr. Farber’s offices in Boston on October 18, 1966, photographer Joe Baker.
[Medical World News Collection, McGovern Historical Center, IC077, negative# MW-118A-11]

The Lasker Awards is one of the most prestigious science awards programs in the world and has been held in New York since 1945. It was established by Albert and Mary Lasker to recognize major innovations and advancements in medicine, especially in the area of cancer research. The recipients of the 1966 Lasker Awards were:

  • Dr. Sidney Farber, who received the Albert Lasker Award for Clinical Research for his career-long work to control childhood leukemia.
  • George E. Palade, who received the Lasker Award for Basic Medical Research for redefining the structure and functions of cells.
  • Eunice Kennedy Shriver, who received the Lasker Award for Public Service in Health for championing legislation to improve care for the mentally retarded.
Posted in Archives, Institutional Collection, Medical World News

Cortisone

by Sandra Yates
Archivist and Special Collections Librarian

As you may or may not know, the McGovern Historical Center houses the personal and professional papers of Philip S. Hench, MD. He was awarded the Nobel Prize in 1950 as co-developer of cortisone treatment for rheumatoid arthritis. While looking through some boxes in the archive, we found this rather dramatic photograph of Hench (second from right) and his colleagues at the Mayo Clinic demonstrating the wonders of a cortisone injection on a Life magazine photographer.

"When Life magazine sent the celebrated ALFRED EISENSTAEDT out to Mayo Clinic to photograph work on cortisone, Mayo consultants retaliated by throwing him on an examining table and subjecting him to cruel duress. At reader's left: Dr. CHARLES H. SLOCUMB; at his left: Dr. EDWARD C. KENDALL (1886-1972), who discovered and partially synthesized cortisone; center: Dr. JAMES ECKMAN; at his left: Dr. PHILIP S. HENCH (1896-1965), who introduced cortisone into the clinical practice of medicine; at his left: Dr. HOWARD F. POLLEY (applying protractor to determine mobility of joint). Dr. KENDALL and Dr. HENCH received the Nobel Prize in Physiology and Medicine in 1950 for their work on cortisone. Photograph taken at Saint Mary's Hospital, Rochester, Minnesota, on May 11, 1949, by ERVIN W. MILLER, Section of Photography of the Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota." [Philip S. Hench, MD Papers, MS076, McGovern Historical Center]

“When Life magazine sent the celebrated ALFRED EISENSTAEDT out to Mayo Clinic to photograph work on cortisone, Mayo consultants retaliated by throwing him on an examining table and subjecting him to cruel duress. At reader’s left: Dr. CHARLES H. SLOCUMB; at his left: Dr. EDWARD C. KENDALL (1886-1972), who discovered and partially synthesized cortisone; center: Dr. JAMES ECKMAN; at his left: Dr. PHILIP S. HENCH (1896-1965), who introduced cortisone into the clinical practice of medicine; at his left: Dr. HOWARD F. POLLEY (applying protractor to determine mobility of joint). Dr. KENDALL and Dr. HENCH received the Nobel Prize in Physiology and Medicine in 1950 for their work on cortisone. Photograph taken at Saint Mary’s Hospital, Rochester, Minnesota, on May 11, 1949, by ERVIN W. MILLER, Section of Photography of the Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota.”
[Philip S. Hench, MD Papers, MS076, McGovern Historical Center]

You can review the finding aid on the McGovern Historical Center website for more information about Philip S. Hench, MD Papers.

Posted in Archives, Manuscript Collection

Product News: Shopping Hints from 1967

by Sandra Yates, Archivist and Special Collections Librarian

Archives Assistant, Gina, started a much-needed inventory of the Medical World News Collection this week. To our surprise, it isn’t just medical news! The archive staff had a great time looking at some of the cutting-edge household products of 1967, and we think you will, too. Here’s a handful of our favorites. You might have some of these concepts in your home today.

The poodle looks annoyed. - Shopping Hints #94, Item #2, Pet Bed. Product News, 2/3/1967. [Medical World News Collection, McGovern Historical Center, IC077, Folder 94.40]

The poodle looks annoyed. – Shopping Hints #94, Item #2, Pet Bed. Product News, 2/3/1967. [Medical World News Collection, McGovern Historical Center, IC077, Folder 94.40]

The Clapper! - Shopping Hints #95, Item #2, Sound Switch. Product News, 2/10/1967. [Medical World News Collection, McGovern Historical Center, IC077, Folder 94.40]

The Clapper! – Shopping Hints #95, Item #2, Sound Switch. Product News, 2/10/1967. [Medical World News Collection, McGovern Historical Center, IC077, Folder 94.40]

It's a pool table and a table! - Shopping Hints #99, Item #2, Billiard Buffet. Product News, 3/17/1967. [Medical World News Collection, McGovern Historical Center, IC077, Folder 94.39]

It’s a pool table and a table! – Shopping Hints #99, Item #2, Billiard Buffet. Product News, 3/17/1967. [Medical World News Collection, McGovern Historical Center, IC077, Folder 94.39]

A place to put your cig while you brush your teeth! - Shopping Hints #99, Item #4, Mountable Ashtray. Product News, 3/17/1967. [Medical World News Collection, McGovern Historical Center, IC077, Folder 94.39]

A place to put your cig while you brush your teeth! – Shopping Hints #99, Item #4, Mountable Ashtray. Product News, 3/17/1967. [Medical World News Collection, McGovern Historical Center, IC077, Folder 94.39]

Useful and tidy! - Shopping Hints #105, Item #4, Stackable Tables. Product News, 4/21/1967. [Medical World News Collection, McGovern Historical Center, IC077, Folder 94.38]

Useful and tidy! – Shopping Hints #105, Item #4, Stackable Tables. Product News, 4/21/1967. [Medical World News Collection, McGovern Historical Center, IC077, Folder 94.38]

Look at all that food! - Shopping Hints #103, Item #2, Convertible Refrigerator. Product News, 4/7/1967. [Medical World News Collection, McGovern Historical Center, IC077, Folder 94.38]

Look at all that food! – Shopping Hints #103, Item #2, Convertible Refrigerator. Product News, 4/7/1967. [Medical World News Collection, McGovern Historical Center, IC077, Folder 94.38]

It's about the stool, not the suspicious looks over a grapefruit. - Shopping Hints #105, Item #2, Adjustable Stool. Product News, 4/21/1967. [Medical World News Collection, McGovern Historical Center, IC077, Folder 94.38]

It’s about the stool, not the suspicious looks over a grapefruit. – Shopping Hints #105, Item #2, Adjustable Stool. Product News, 4/21/1967. [Medical World News Collection, McGovern Historical Center, IC077, Folder 94.38]

Sigh... folding towels to music. - Shopping Hints #96, Item #4, Stereo Theatre. Product News, 3/3/1967. [Medical World News Collection, McGovern Historical Center, IC077, Folder 94.39]

Sigh… folding towels to music. – Shopping Hints #96, Item #4, Stereo Theatre. Product News, 3/3/1967. [Medical World News Collection, McGovern Historical Center, IC077, Folder 94.39]

Posted in Institutional Collection, Medical World News

Mystery church: Solved!

Alethea Drexler

archives assistant

We got a pile of emails about this one, from architectural detectives from who knows how many institutions and organizations.

After a lot of wrangling, Lauren at the University of Houston suggested that it might be the First Evangelical Lutheran Church, which is no longer standing but was located on Texas Avenue between Austin and Caroline Streets–she noted, too, that maps showed a curve in the streetcar tracks on Caroline.  Several readers have commented on the streetcar tracks, which do curve.

The First Evangelical Lutheran was founded in 1851 and their website says that the congregation “moved to the northwest corner of Texas Avenue at Caroline Street, to a new red brick and sandstone edifice built in the Gothic tradition” in 1901.  I emailed them.  They emailed me back but also passed my inquiry to Preservation Houston.

Jim with Preservation Houston called me to say they had gotten a “flood of emails” all of a sudden about an unidentified church in a blog post but confirmed that it was the First Evangelical Lutheran and said that there is a memorial plaque on a lamppost near its former location.

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Posted in architecture, Images

Can you identify this church?

Alethea Drexler
archives assistant

I did a quick inventory of a box of photographs the other day as part of our preparations for the Library Centennial next year. This box is from the Hermann Historical collection but it’s kind of a grab bag: It includes pictures of George Hermann, of Hospital staff in the 1940’s, of downtown Houston in the early twentieth century, nursing school graduates, and even copies of a few pictures of downtown Houston before the Civil War.

Most of the items either came with captions or were easily identified. One of them, though, is playing hard to get so I thought I’d post it here to see if anyone out there could help. (Would I sound more cutting-edge if I said I was “crowdsourcing” this? I’m crowdsourcing it.)

This beautiful, no-holds-barred, Disney palace of a Gothic church has a cornerstone but the lettering on it isn’t legible, no matter how powerful a loupe I use. Higher-resolution scanning won’t help; the individual letters just don’t exist in the photo. I have tried searching for “Houston church”, “Houston Gothic church”, by all kinds of denominations, and even “Houston church postcard”. Believe it or not, the postcard search has worked for me before since photo-postcards of showy buildings used to be so popular; I’ve identified buildings that no longer exist because I found postcards of them on eBay. Internet research can be weird.

Gothic church from Hermann Estate photo collection edit

However, the nets keep coming in empty on this one.

My best guess is that this image was taken in the first quarter of the twentieth century, but I don’t have much basis for that apart from that range being in keeping with the dates of most of the rest of the images in the box. I don’t actually know that it’s in Houston, either, but if it’s not I have no idea how we’ll ever find it, and I had to start somewhere.

If anyone has any more suggestions or recognizes the building, please let us know. We haven’t found any documentation and we would love to know which church this is and where it was located.

Addendum:

We’ve gotten several contributions from Library staff and from readers.  Some of the observations included:

1) In addition to the obvious Gothic Revival style [Encyclopedia Britannica online], Laurel noted that the building has a Romanesque flavor [Wentworthstudio.com], which would put construction after about 1880, and probably between 1890 and 1905.  The trees along the side of the church are pretty small so, if this picture were taken, say, around 1910, it seems reasonable that the building was fairly new at the time.

2) Reader Kirk commented with this Wikimedia Commons link to an 1891 map of Houston.  There are two churches at Texas and Milam streets that resemble the building in this picture.  This is across the street from the Houston Chronicle building now; the area has been completely modernized and none of the buildings on the map are still around.  (The famous 1884 Cotton Exchange [HoustonArchitecture.com] on Travis Street is featured among the vignettes at the bottom.)

3) Other readers suggested that the rest of the picture resembled the Heights.

4) The church does look a lot like Annunciation Catholic Church.  This church seems to be smaller, but Annunciation was remodeled in 1884, so the two buildings were probably similar in age.  [Annunciation Catholic Church]

5) The streetcar tracks are common in old pictures of Houston.  Houston used streetcars mostly between 1891 and 1940.  [Houston Streetcar History Pages]

Posted in Uncategorized

Fracture Apparatus

by Sandra Yates
Archivist and Special Collections Librarian

I was going through the photograph files today, looking for some interesting images for our up coming centennial celebration, and I came across a envelope labeled “Fracture Apparatus, c. 1890s.” Obviously, I had to take a look! There were four negative images from the George Tiemann & Co.’s Surgical Instruments catalog, published in 1889. Oh my, the contraptions and the description are amazing! I almost believe I can put these apparatuses together like IKEA furniture.

"Buck's apparatus, for suspending the upper limbs, is made of iron tubing; its upright portion is fastened by clamps at the head of the bedstead and its lower portion overhangs the bed and holds suspended at its extremity a flattened strip of hard wood, on the upper edge of which a row of screw-heads serves for fastening the ends of the canvas bands that suspend the limb. The strip of wood that supports the limb plays horizontally on a swivel-joint at the extremity of the iron tubing. For suspending the lower limbs five-eighth inch iron tubing is bent, in the manner shown by the picture. The horizontal portion overhanging the bed is supported by two upright iron rods resting upon the mattress astraddle of the thigh. A row of screw-heads inserted along the outer surface of the horizontal portion serves for fastening the end of the canvas bands that suspend the limb. The upright portion of the apparatus is securely fastened to the two cross-rods at the foot of the bedstead by clamps, and can be adjusted at any required height. The suspending bands are of stout sail-cloth canvas, cut of any required length and width, and buttoned on the the screw-heads by slits cut for the purpose. The canvas being very strong does not tear, and will sustain any weight it has to bear"

Buck’s Suspension Apparatus: “for suspending the upper limbs, is made of iron tubing; its upright portion is fastend by clamps at the head of the bedstead and its lower portion overhangs the bed and holds suspended at its extremity a flattened strip of hard wood, on the upper edge of which a row of screw-heads serves for fastening the ends of the canvas bands that suspend the limb. The strip of wood that supports the limb plays horizontally on a swivel-joint at the extremity of the iron tubing. For suspending the lower limbs five-eighth inch iron tubing is bent, in the manner shown by the picture. The horizontal portion overhanging the bed is supported by two upright iron rods resting upon the mattress astraddle of the thigh. A row of screw-heads inserted along the outer surface of the horizontal portion serves for fastening the end of the canvas bands that suspend the limb. The upright portion of the apparatus is securely fastened to the two cross-rods at the foot of the bedstead by clamps, and can be adjusted at any required height. The suspending bands are of stout sail-cloth canvas, cut of any required length and width, and buttoned on the the screw-heads by slits cut for the purpose. The canvas being very strong does not tear, and will sustain any weight it has to bear” [“The American armamentarium chirurgicum” by George Tiemann & Co. McGovern Reference Collection, McGovern Historical Center.]

Buck's Extension "consists of: 1st. Two bands of heavy adhesive plaster, to which are attached the necessary buckle and elastic webbing. 2d. A perineal band, for counter extension, made of heavy rubber tubing, with straps, buckles and rings. 3d. Four guttered coaptation splints, leather covers; three elastic straps with buckles for fastening the same. 4th. One pulley, one bag for shot and some strong fishing line." ["The American armamentarium chirurgicum" by George Tiemann & Co. McGovern Reference Collection, McGovern Historical Center.]

Buck’s Extension “consists of: 1st. Two bands of heavy adhesive plaster, to which are attached the necessary buckle and elastic webbing. 2d. A perineal band, for counter extension, made of heavy rubber tubing, with straps, buckles and rings. 3d. Four guttered coaptation splints, leather covers; three elastic straps with buckles for fastening the same. 4th. One pulley, one bag for shot and some strong fishing line.” [“The American armamentarium chirurgicum” by George Tiemann & Co. McGovern Reference Collection, McGovern Historical Center.]

Coaptation Splints ["The American armamentarium chirurgicum" by George Tiemann & Co. McGovern Reference Collection, McGovern Historical Center.]

Coaptation Splints [“The American armamentarium chirurgicum” by George Tiemann & Co. McGovern Reference Collection, McGovern Historical Center.]

Sayre's Extension Sundries: "...consisting of two stout tapes, A, adjusted through button holes to the cross-piece, C. The ends of A are attached to the plaster secured to the limb, and C very nearly approaches the sole of the foot. To C is attached a strong cord, to run over the pulley B. To the end of the cord is to be attached a bag, as shown..." ["The American armamentarium chirurgicum" by George Tiemann & Co. McGovern Reference Collection, McGovern Historical]

Sayre’s Extension Sundries: “…consisting of two stout tapes, A, adjusted through button holes to the cross-piece, C. The ends of A are attached to the plaster secured to the limb, and C very nearly approaches the sole of the foot. To C is attached a strong cord, to run over the pulley B. To the end of the cord is to be attached a bag, as shown…” [“The American armamentarium chirurgicum” by George Tiemann & Co. McGovern Reference Collection, McGovern Historical]

"The American armamentarium chirurgicum" by George Tiemann & Co. McGovern Reference Collection, McGovern Historical Center.

“The American armamentarium chirurgicum” by George Tiemann & Co., page 577. McGovern Reference Collection, McGovern Historical Center.

"The American armamentarium chirurgicum" by George Tiemann & Co. McGovern Reference Collection, McGovern Historical Center.

“The American armamentarium chirurgicum” by George Tiemann & Co., page 582-583. McGovern Reference Collection, McGovern Historical Center.

Posted in Medical Archives, Special Collections
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